Here We Celebrated.

I can say with great confidence that we’re all weary of COVID and the toll it has taken on so many areas of life.

Yesterday, in spite of everything, in spite of a young girl’s fear that the celebration of her eleventh birthday would be confined to the virtual world, a small family gathering took place at our home. Social distancing was respected, and my beautiful daughter had a chance to safely bask in the love of her three-dimensional family. However, physical touch outside of immediate family was a no-go.

I composed a short poem to reflect on what has been the experiences of so many.

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They came! Pure joy, bright smile, Grandma! Grandpa!

Air hug, squeeze tight, baby girl, please stay safe!

Can they play? I miss the swing, push me high!

Too close, I know, will my heart ache forever?

Daddy, I am glad, but sad, it hurts so bad.

Please play with me. We’ll catch a butterfly.

Leave the net, and step away, so they can see.

Daddy, you are holding me! I’m not a bug.

Who wants a bug when there’s an angel to hug?

Don’t be a Cheechako! Trivia Answers Revealed.

Good morning, afternoon, or whatever time you find yourself reading this post. Now, before we put our Mackinaw jackets on to prepare for the frigid climate of a wintry Yukon, I want you to stretch out. If we’re going to find some gold, then a lot of digging needs to be done.

Oh alright, we’ll just do one exercise. It’s a simple one, all you need to do is shrug and roll your eyes. Got It? Bully for you! Now repeat after me, “I am ready to “expand” my mind with useless trivia that has no practical value, whatsoever.”

Do this three times . . . now you’re in the proper mindset.

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Duffer:

A:  a slow-witted man

Bunco:

C: anything phony or deceptive

Barabas:

A: Indigenous homes along the lower Yukon River built half underground, inhabited in winter.

Kanin:

C: an ornately decorated dugout canoe

Now, in case your head can take more, here are some bonus words:

Cheechako:  Someone new to Alaska or the Yukon; originally, a gold rush newcomer.

Sourdough (yes, it’s a type of bread, too)  A person who has survived at least one winter in Alaska

Now for some cool nineteenth century slang to use at your next social(ly distanced) function:

Catawamptiously chewed up: utterly defeated

“Face it, Zena, I’ve won ten rounds of rock-paper-scissors. You have been catawamptiously chewed up.”

Catch a weasel asleep: in reference to trying to surprise a person who is always alert.

“Good luck with the surprise party for Charlie, you might as well catch a weasel asleep.”

Hornswoggle, honey-fuggled: to cheat

“Mary Anne, you’re nothing but a honey-fuggler! You’ve somehow predicted the bingo numbers.”

Wake snakes: make a lot of noise, cause a ruckus, or just have a great time.

“Let’s wake snakes with this Pampered Chef party!”

 

 

 

 

Don’t be a Cheechako!

I hope everyone had a good weekend, in particular my friends to the south who celebrated Independence Day weekend.

I haven’t done this in quite some time, but folks seem to enjoy it, so today I’m bringing out another word trivia. Now, these are not just any words, they are connected with my upcoming book. They stretch back to the days of the Klondike.

Please, if you can, practice ‘googlestraint’ and I’ll give you the answers in my next blog. Have fun!

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Duffer:

A:  a slow-witted man

B:  the front bumper of a dog sled

C: a con man who is terrible at his trade

D: combining brass filings with gold dust to fool the weigh scales

Bunco:

A: a card game that evolved from Poker during the Klondike

B: a gold claim with very few, if any, yields

C: anything phony or deceptive

D: a low-class drinking establishment

Barabas:

A: Indigenous homes along the lower Yukon River built half underground, inhabited in winter.

B: in reference to the Biblical figure who was released instead of Jesus. A scoundrel who escapes justice.

C: a claim jumper

D: the buckle used to connect the suspenders to a pair of Mackinaw hip-waders

Kanin:

A: the canvas baffle on a rocker box (rocker boxes were used to separate gold from sediment)

B: the pivot pin on a weigh scale

C: an ornately decorated dugout canoe

D: the small overhang usually found on the false front of a business

Silver#writephoto

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A shoal in a stream of humdrum

Anchored till there’s naught left of me

All else roams free

Waters lap and return downstream

Winds kiss my nape as they blow past

Grain by grain they erode and scar me

I envy those grains, for they’ll travel far

Those lush green hills will never shade me whole

My brethren, so close, yet unreachable

Subject to the same fate, they suffer together

I’m condemned to a solitary demise

In spite of all, I’ve learned to cope

For when darkness falls, and the skies are clear

Starlight guests shine in my watery mirror

Written for Sue Vincent Weekly Write Photo Challenge

Feathered Guests

A good Saturday morning to all! Today, the sun shines with only a few wispy clouds dotting the sky. I want to tell you about a little adventure we had on our yard last week. The tale proves that your feet don’t need to carry you past the gatepost to create lifelong memories.

The COVID Pandemic has slowed the world, and though not a pleasant experience, it has taught us to appreciate the simpler pleasures. Like the little duck, we named Griffin, that wandered onto our lawn last week.

At first, we were surprised by the proximity to which we could approach Griffin. We reasoned he must belong to a local. Tanya put a shout out on social media, but no owner came forward.

There were some guesses as to what type of duck, and the gender. Know-it-All Google had the answer. A comparison of photos led to the conclusion that our guest was a Muscovy.  No one had the stomach to physically check for gender, so we relied on an online list of observed behaviors that indicated it was a dude.

Now, Muscovy ducks dine on mice, snakes, and other vermin, so in my books that makes Griffin a hero. We all agreed Griffin was welcome to stay.

Griffin chose the area under the treehouse and our kids happily tended to his needs.

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Just make yourself comfortable, Griffin. Need anything?

 

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Um . . . I’m no expert on drinking from a frisbee, but wouldn’t the water stay in better if you leave your feet out?

 

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How about a bucket, is that better?

Homemade duck bath, equals one happy fowl.

 

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Meanwhile, in the front yard, this poor baby needed saving. Reuntited with a chirping Mother Robin moments after this was taken.

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That night we camped in the wilds of our backyard, and when I awoke and exited the tent, Griffin was under the treehouse, standing guard.

Well, for us older folks, and perhaps just us Canucks, the whole story ended like an episode of the Littlest Hobo.  The next day we woke to find Griffen had moved on. Perhaps to brighten the day for another COVID weary family.