Bigfoot Is Coming!

Today I have the privilege of welcoming my special guest, D.L. Finn! She is an author who is responsible for wonderful stories, across various genres! In this blog, she will be discussing her upcoming publication.

 

 

I want to thank Mark for inviting me on his blog! Since becoming a member of Rave Reviews Book Club I have been lucky to meet a lot of extraordinary authors, including Mark, and develop friendships along the way. Mark’s book Vanished is high on my TBR list for this summer’s reading.

Besides all the amazing books I’ve been lucky to read, I’ve been working, too. One project has been my first short story Bigfoot: A Short Story for “The 90-Day, Alpha / Omega (Beginning to End) Short Story Writing Contest” RRBC is hosting.

This has forced me to flex those unused short story muscles I haven’t used in a while. Luckily it came back to me quickly and I found a new freedom that writing novels doesn’t allow. My inner child took over and began to soar. The idea for “Bigfoot” came from a newspaper article a few years back when a local lake was being poisoned a second time to remove pike fish from it. The reasoning was the pike would kill the local species of fish–especially the trout. Aside from how I felt about pouring toxic chemicals into Lake Davis twice, I began to wonder what if. Then my what if laid around for many years until this contest where it became Bigfoot. This story is different than anything I’ve written before, but within my X-File type interest. Here is a short blurb:

Can you believe everything you read? Steve must answer that question when he finds a strange blog while searching for his friend’s address.  It was crazy to consider the government would poison a lake to find Bigfoot–and Steve wasn’t crazy. But, there were also some truths weaved into this unbelievable tale. Steve began to question his comfortable reality as he kept reading.

Bigfoot: A Short Story is available for pre-order now on Amazon with the release date of June 21st–for the first day of summer!

 

D.L. Finn is an independent California local, who encourages everyone to embrace their inner child. She was born and raised in the foggy Bay Area, but in 1990 relocated with her husband, kids, dogs and cats to the Sierra foothills in Nevada City, CA.  She immersed herself in reading all types of books, but especially loved romance, horror and fantasy. She always treasured creating her own reality on paper. Finally, being surrounded by towering pines, oaks and cedars, her creativity was cradled until it bloomed. Her creations vary from children’s books, young adult fantasy, adult paranormal romance to an autobiography with poetry. She continues on her adventure with an open invitation to her readers to join her.

Please click on the links below to see what D.L. is up to.

Website and Blog

Twitter

Instagram

Facebook

Pinterest

The Beauty of The Forgotten

There’s beauty in the abandoned. The overgrown pathway can offer more treasures than the sidewalk. The steady beat of your footsteps on a dirt trail are drum beats, announcing an imminent encounter with adventure!

Who knows what you’ll find?

waterfall

Decay can nourish splendor!

flowers

The neglected can house a wonderful new friend!

oldmanhouse

Where will your feet take you today?

 

 

“Oh! Deer!” . . . or . . . “Oh, deer.”

 

Quick! What do you see in the photo above? Is it just trees and grass? Wait, what is that in the background? Are there two shapes that do not match the flora? Are they an illusion? Sasquatches on their knees, looking for gopher holes?

Continue reading “Oh! Deer!” . . . or . . . “Oh, deer.”

Success is just failure. . . Recycled!

November 27, 2017

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Mark Bierman

“I recycle.”

“Good for you,” you might say. “It’s great to keep those water bottles and batteries out of the landfills. I recycle too.”

“Do you?”

“Umm, yes. Haven’t you seen that tiny garbage can in my office? The one that has ‘I made this much garbage’ stenciled on it? I really do that.”

 

If that’s you, keep up the great work! Saving the planet is a very noble cause, but it’s not physical waste that I’m talking about here.

What do you do with your disappointment?

Do you bury frustration deep inside when Jack, the office grandstander, steals your well-deserved promotion? What about when those nay-sayers mock your dream to build a waterpark in the backyard?

I’ve been there and done that. Not anymore. I’ve decided to follow the examples of the people mentioned below. I’m going to take all of that emotional garbage and recycle it into a can-do attitude.

What about you?

Oprah Winfrey

After being fired for failure to control her emotions, Oprah went on to create one of the most popular talk shows in history and her own production company.

Walt Disney

Today the name Walt Disney conjures up images of Mickey Mouse, amusement parks and family fun. This was not always so. Failure after failure drove this icon to an emotional breakdown in midlife. He developed the habit of quiet reflection which lead to new ideas and the result is what you see today.

JK Rowling

Despite the death of her mother, divorce, and raising her child in poverty, the creator of “Harry Potter” rose from the ashes and became a best-selling author. There was no magic to her success, just plain old resilience.

Thomas Edison

Have you ever tried to do something 10,000 times? That’s the number of tries it took for Edison to finally light up that bulb.  When asked by a newspaper reporter if he felt like a failure and if he should give up, after having gone through over 9,000 failed attempts, Edison simply stated “Why would I feel like a failure? And why would I ever give up? I now know definitely over 9,000 ways an electric lightbulb will not work. Success is almost in my grasp.” Teachers once labelled him as “too stupid to learn.”

Apparently, he “failed” to live up to their standards when he patented 1,093 inventions

in the U.S.

Replace all negativity with these attitudes:

Do you believe in your passion? Don’t give up.

Is your idea great? Keep going.

Can’t find the right market placement? Build it.

Can’t get to the right people? Think of something different to open doors.

Failed again? Revise it. Learn from feedback and make it better.

Our modern culture has an underlying belief that failure is the expectation and belief that failure should equate stopping.  Success is the exception.

The accumulation of failure equates growth. We become wiser, smarter and braver each time we fail.

Who are we kidding? Failure hurts. The victory lies in picking yourself up and

foraging ahead with a new perspective, some well-earned knowledge and a thicker skin. Embrace each failure. You may be closer to success than you realize.

Define your own meaning of success.

Then shoot for the stars, wiping the stardust off along the way.