Life Lessons I Took from Books, by Patricia Furstenberg

Hello, welcome to my blog, or, if you are a regular, welcome back. My friends to the south are observing Memorial Day, a time to remember and honor those who gave their lives defending the United States.

My guest, Patricia Furstenberg,  is the author of Silent Heroes , an action-packed adventure about the U.S. Marines in Afghanistan. Please click on the link above to see my review.  Today, she discusses how books can teach us valuable life-lessons. I’ll let her take it from here.  

A good book can take us through a multitude of experiences and can bring us that little ray of light during troubled times, when we are dealing with a moral dilemma. A great book can also rekindle a blissful moment of pure happiness we once experienced, only to discard into a dusty corner of our minds. No book is useless from this point of view, any volume can become a true manna if read at the right time. We learn quicker from books, but books also help us clarify an experience we are currently dealing with. It can happen that a paragraph in a book is so enlightening that we see it as a life experience, allowing us to finally put into words a past even we went through, yet not fully dealt with.

telephonebooth

Like any life lesson from sources other than personal, those took from books cannot really be assimilated unless they overlap, at least partially, over our individual experiences. For example, it can be difficult to understand that you deserve love and that you are able to receive it if life has taught you differently. However, you do feel when you come across a wise word in a book that love might indeed suit you, so your soul becomes more prepared to accept the truth of those words.

Probably one of the most valuable lessons we learn very quickly from books is that things are rarely just white or black. Life comes in all shades and colours, no matter wat chromatic preferences we have; we cannot really categorize people, relationships, feelings, or visions.

When you feel lost, it’s almost a consolation to read Agatha Christie’s  An Autobiography and find out the trouble she faced and how she figuring out how to deal with them, so life can go on. Moreover, Austen’s Pride and Prejudice whispers that we shouldn’t be afraid if we don’t have all the answers when we need them, because it is the experience that shows us the path towards happiness. In addition, it is important not to wait for the definition of happiness to be given to us by other people because only we are the masters of our hearts.

Dumas’ Count of Monte Cristo is a motivational classic read, showing us that it is never too late to make a radical change and even one single day can be extremely important in one’s life. Time is precious. From Oscar Wild’s Picture of Dorian Gray we learn that the present is probably the most important step along the winding road that life is, and that it is best to give up the past, yet never pretend that it did not happen. One way or another, each experience we go through has a meaning and a role in shaping us and thus our subsequent choices and future existence. Along the same lines J.R.R. Tolkien The Hobbit teaches us not to deny ourselves any experience just because it might become uncomfortable; for it each one has the capacity to become a defining moment of our existence.

Larsson’s Girl with a Dragon Tattoo delivers a message similar to the one found in The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. Larsson’s book shows us that anyone can become a hero, and that heroes can even be those who do not consider themselves as such; Tolkien’s trilogy tells us that sometimes even the most insignificant being can change the destiny of humanity. Any individual can play an equally important role.

Anne Frank’s Diary of a Young Girl is a powerful life lesson through the words of a 15-year-old child. If you show imagination even in the darkest moments, this will shine a light on many qualities you never knew you possessed.

It may be that the people who have the greatest impact on our lives are not around us for a very long time. That is why is important to learn from them, about them, before they pass on. Those people, writes Mitch Albom in Tuesdays with Morrie, are the ones who help us become what we are meant to be.

For those with a love for words, Zusak’s Book Thief comes with a warning: words are valuable, don’t waste them; words are extraordinarily powerful tools. They can be used towards good or evil, so measure them carefully.

I love books for the lessons I actively learn from them and for the lessons I picked up without realizing. How not to try to do everything at once; how not to you try to change others, but to accept them as they are; how not to believe everything I’m told; how to go on an adventure, but also remember where I came from and that returning home can be even more pleasant; or how to give life purpose by helping others and how not to let those around me set their limits on what I am capable of achieving.

About Patricia:

Patsmall

Patricia Furstenberg writes with passion about history that blends with fiction, about war heroes, human or canine, and she also pens humorous poetry & haiku about nature and dogs. With a medical degree behind her, Patricia is passionate about mind, brain and education and the psychology behind it. She also loves coffee and she loves to travel.

Her latest book, Silent Heroes: When Love and Values Are Worth Fighting for, is a highly emotional read, action-packed, a vivid story of enormous sacrifice and bravery. Silent Heroes is a narrative about the value of life. Whose are the spoils-of-war? A new look at the War in Afghanistan, at the MWD, Military Working Dogs and the brave Marines fighting it, but also at the Afghans caught in it.

One of her first books, Joyful Trouble, was an Amazon Bestseller in Historical Fiction, Africa.
Her book of poems “As Good As Gold” became a #1 New Release the day it was published.

Patricia’s writing is filled with “creativity and vivid imagery” and she knows how to “capture the reader’s imagination.”
Her words penned in her children’s books “truly make the world a happier and more beautiful place!”

Patricia Furstenberg came to writing though reading, her passion for books being something she inherited from her parents. As a winner of the Write Your Own Christie Competition, the Judges “were impressed by her thorough investigation and admired the strength of her narrative; they were impressed by her style”. The judges thought Patricia’s writing style is “well structured, with a great sense of tension and suspense”, “confident and intriguing”. The Judges were Mathew Prichard, David Brawn from Harper Collins UK and Daniel Mallory from Harper Collins US.

An avid reader, Patricia Furstenberg enjoys historical fiction, especially the Late Middle Ages, and war stories that are a blend of facts, folklore, mystery and include a dog or two. She also loves contemporary fiction, especially mystery and crime, classical poetry and haiku. Some of her favorite authors include, without being limited to, Agatha Christie, Kathy Reichs, Elizabeth Kostova, Dan Brown, Ionel Teodoreanu, Camil Petrescu.

‘I love to explore the human imagination. I am a tourist of history, a permanent guest in the labyrinth of books, a student in the world of art.’

Patricia blogs extensively and has articles & interviews published by Huffington Post UK, Biz Community, Books by Women.

Connect with Patricia and purchase a book: 

Website / Twitter / Facebook / Pintrest / Follow Blog on Email / Linked in / LovelyBooksDE / Goodreads / BookBub  / Amazon.com / Amazon.UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to Day 5 of the “EMPTY SEATS” Blog Tour! @EmptySeatsNovel @4WillsPub #RRBC #Baseball

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During this tour, the author is giving away (1) $10 Amazon Gift Card, (2) $5 Amazon Gift Cards, (2) e-book copies of EMPTY SEATS & (1) copy of the author’s acclaimed “SINGING ALONG WITH THE RADIO” CD which features many prominent folk music singers (a $15 value)! For your chance to win, all you have to do is leave a comment below as well as leaving a comment on the author’s 4WillsPub tour page.  GOOD LUCK!

Day Five (Empty Seats)

The Minor League Life

Empty Seats provides a glimpse into the life of a minor-league baseball player in 1972.

But what’s changed in the 48 years since then?  Empty-Seats-by-Wanda-Adams-Fischer

Some minor-league players at the lower levels still stay in private homes, close to the ballparks where they play. They still travel by bus from game to game. Today’s buses are at least air-conditioned and some even have rest rooms on board.

What has not changed, however, is the grueling competition these young men face for very little money, on the outside chance that they may be good enough to play in the big leagues.

When a youngster starts playing baseball at an early age and is bitten by the “bug,” and starts to work even as a seven- or eight-year old, dreaming of the day when he will be able to step into the batter’s box or onto the pitching mound at his favorite Major League ballpark, a light may switch on in his head. By the time he’s in middle school, he can feel that he has talent, but it takes work. When other kids are playing video games, he’s out running on the school track or along the side of the road. He’s decided this is the game for him.

His parents or guardians know what he’s aiming for—the golden ring, the big kahuna, The Show—to make it into Major League Baseball. They know they’ll have to make sacrifices on his behalf. Maybe they’ll have to find personal coaches to tutor him in running, pitching, batting, base stealing. Maybe they’ll have to invest in one of the nationally known camps or baseball academies such as the Baseball Factory, which combine classroom sessions in strategy with on-field instruction.

By the time he’s in high school, he’ll try out for the varsity team, even as a freshman. If he has enough talent, and the varsity coach needs someone with his skills at a particular position, he’ll probably make it. If not, he’ll play on the junior varsity and on American Legion baseball or other amateur teams that won’t ruin his high school eligibility.

Baseball scouts may be lurking in the wings, watching what he and his teammates are doing. They’re searching for special players for the annual baseball players draft.

But wait—what about college? Shouldn’t he consider attending college and playing college ball?

I attended a session in 2006 during which Mike Lowell, the All-Star third baseman for the Red Sox, discussed his choice—if one can call it that—to forego being drafted and instead enter college. Here’s how he described it:

I was all excited about being drafted. I was just about turning handsprings. My father, who’d played ball in Cuba before defecting to the United States, turned to me and said something to the effect of, ‘Are you done?’ ‘What?’ I responded, ‘I’m going to play baseball!’ ‘Not until you go to college first.’ ‘College? What do you mean, college? I’m going to play baseball!’ He sat me down and explained to me that I needed to go to college because I needed to have something to fall back on. He told me that I’d become a better ballplayer because I’d get coaching from a college-level coach. He also said that I might get hurt playing ball and that I’d get stronger if I played at the college level. And he said that I’d have a career if I had a college degree. I, of course, thought he was crazy. I ran around the house slamming doors and finally agreed that I’d go to college first and then go back in the draft.

And you know what? He was right. I did become stronger, faster, and a better ballplayer. I would run into coaches along the way, and they’d say, ‘Hey, aren’t you Carl Lowell’s kid? He was a heck of a ballplayer in Cuba.’

That was my father, who sacrificed his own baseball career when he left Cuba, moved with his family to Puerto Rico and lived in a crowded two-bedroom flat until they could get to the mainland. He gave up baseball entirely and went to dental school. He became a dentist so that he could support his family and we could become whatever we wanted to be. He made those sacrifices so that I could be a baseball player. He knew what he was doing when he told me to go to college. He was so right. I was so wrong.

When asked by a young fan in the crowd what his own advice would be to youngsters who wanted to become professional baseball players, Mike Lowell said, “I’m not too fond of video games. If you want to play baseball, or any sport, on a higher level, you need to move. You need to play baseball, or ride your bike, or run, or be moving. That’s how you’ll get to be a better ballplayer. Video games make you lazy.”

He didn’t discuss how difficult minor-league life was on his early career. But many have reminisced about their troubles in the minors, and talked about how hard it is to be away from home, not having those who have sacrificed their whole lives and helped get them where they were.

Those are some of the issues my main characters—Jimmy, Bobby and Bud—deal with on a daily basis in Empty Seats. They’re far away from their respective homes, playing ball in Jamestown, New York, in an unfamiliar place, with people they’ve just met because fate landed them on the same Planet Baseball.

These are the issues you’ll find if you attend a minor-league baseball game and look into the dugout and see the faces of the young players. Some of them don’t speak English because they’re from Latin American countries. The universal language of baseball is spoken on the field but moving into a home with a local family and not speaking their language can be difficult.

Today’s minor-league teams are doing things that help players to acclimate themselves to their new surroundings. Most offer English as a second language classes for players and even some basic Spanish for the local family members.

Another part of their training is off the field, in learning to make personal appearances. Several years ago, I worked at a local physical rehabilitation hospital. We were replacing the roof and had to move patients to another area of the hospital during the day while the roofers were banging away. Our recreation therapy department decided to have certain special days to keep patients occupied, and we had a “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” day, complete with hot dogs, popcorn, Cracker Jacks, and other baseball-appropriate snacks. We invited the local minor-league baseball team, the Valley Cats (affiliated with the Houston Astros), to send a player or two, in uniform, to the event. As part of their community outreach and training to meet fans, two players came and met patients in wheelchairs, signing tiny baseballs for them and playing baseball-themed games.

The patients loved this day; the sad part, however, is that neither player ever made it to the major leagues.

Getting back to low pay for minor-league players: They are paid so poorly that most have to work part-time during and after the season in order to be able to live. After the low-A and single-A levels, they no longer live with families, but rather, six or seven will get together and rent an apartment to save money. Those who are married face an even bigger dilemma, since they must find apartments to accommodate a couple and/or a family.

During the 2019 playoffs between the New York Yankees and the Milwaukee Brewers, Yankee fans taunted a Brewers pitcher who’d been called up prior to the playoffs. They yelled, “Uber! Uber! Uber!” at him to tease him about the part-time job he’d had in order to supplement his income. Most fans watching a Major League game wouldn’t think that a player in MLB would need to supplement his income, but someone who’d been in the minors for a long time might have to do just that. His pitching performance was mediocre, at best, during the playoffs, but he never denied that he had a part-time job.

Some private citizens believe in supporting minor leaguers so much that they sponsor efforts to sponsor individual players. One person I met via Twitter has sponsorships going for five players, where private people send about $150 per month to assist with living expenses via gift cards or cash while they’re playing in the minor leagues. With no baseball as of the writing of this blog, some of those minor leaguers are also facing immigration issues.

In the movie Bull Durham, Kevin Costner plays a catcher who’s seen many a phenom come and go. He’s stuck around the minors for perhaps too long when a kid with a blazing fast ball and a face like Kansas corn comes along (played by Tim Robbins). Costner not only has to mentor the kid on his pitching, but also has to advise him on how to talk to the press. When it becomes obvious that the Robbins character will be called up to the majors, and Costner still stays behind in the minors, Costner gives him his talking points on what to say to the media who surround him as they report the news.

Costner is, in many ways, the epitome of the person who hangs around minor-league baseball too long, hoping against hope that one day he, too, will get the call to The Show. He’s the guy characterized in folksinger Greg Brown’s song “Laughing River”:

Twenty years in the minor leagues–
Ain’t no place I didn’t go.
Well I gotta few hits,
But I never made the show.
And I could hang on for a few years,
Doin what I’ve done before.
I wanna hear the Laughing River,
Flowin’ right outside my door.

It’s the story of a man who’s held on for too long and finally realizes he has to go home, to where the Laughing River flows.

Perhaps it’s the story of some characters you’ll meet if you read Empty Seats—hanging on to their dreams too long instead of going home. Or maybe not. Maybe they’ll surprise you. Or you’ll have to look forward to the sequel. 

Book Blurb

What Little Leaguer doesn’t dream of walking from the dugout onto a Major League baseball field, facing his long-time idol and striking his out? Empty Seats follows three different minor-league baseball pitchers as they follow their dreams to climb the ladder from minor- to major-league ball, while facing challenges along the way—not always on the baseball diamond. This coming-of-age novel takes on success and failure in unexpected ways. One reviewer calls this book “a tragic version of ‘The Sandlot.’”

(Winner of the 2019 New Apple Award and 2019 Independent Publishing Award)

Author Bio

Wanda Adams Fischer (2) (1)

 

Following a successful 40-year career in public relations/marketing/media relations, Wanda Adams Fischer parlayed her love for baseball into her first novel, Empty Seats. She began writing poetry and short stories when she was in the second grade in her hometown of Weymouth, Massachusetts and has continued to write for more than six decades. In addition to her “day” job, she has been a folk music DJ on public radio for more than 40 years, including more than 37 at WAMC-FM, the Albany, New York-based National Public Radio affiliate. In 2019, Folk Alliance International inducted her into their Folk D-J Hall of Fame. A singer/songwriter in her own right, she’s produced one CD, “Singing Along with the Radio.” She’s also a competitive tennis player and has captained several United States Tennis Association senior teams that have secured berths at sectional and national events. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Northeastern University in Boston. She lives in Schenectady, NY, with her husband of 47 years, Bill, a retired family physician, whom she met at a coffeehouse in Boston in 1966; they have two grown children and six grandchildren.

Social Media Links

Twitter

Facebook

Amazon and Other Purchase Links

Book: Buy on Amazon

Audio book: Buy Audible Book

Buy on Barnes & Noble

wandafischer.com

Thank you for supporting this author and her tour.  To follow along with the rest of the tour, please drop in on the author’s 4WillsPub  tour page

If you’d like to schedule your own 4WillsPub blog tour to promote your book(s), you may do so by clicking HERE.

 

 

Review of Tiger House, by Wendy Scott

The Blurb:

Betrayed. Kidnapped.
Mistaken for a warrior; Jairus must survive the Emperor’s Games.
Disposed. Ostracized.
Tekagi seeks vengeance and power.
Farm boy versus sorceress.
An empire hinges on the outcome.

Thousands compete for the dragon banner, but in the end there can only be one winner.

The adjudicator thumped the scepter into the ground three times. “By the fates, the war dragons will not return until a new emperor wins the dragon scepter.”
The crowd parted as Tekagi threaded her way toward the funeral cart waiting by the main gate. Tiger pelts adorned the two caskets. Only emperors earned the right to be entombed within the Dragon Palace. The sons were relegated to less hallowed ground.
A few of her most treasured belongings were also piled on the cart. No longer an emperor’s daughter she was being cast out of the palace. A limp tiger tail trailed over the side of the cart. She ran the tips of her obsidian finger stalls along its striped length before tucking it beneath a tapestry.
She tapped her fan against the cart’s side and the driver flicked the horses’ reins into a funeral march. Head bowed, she followed a few paces behind, flanked by her two bodyguards. As she exited through the palace gates and headed to Tiger House she patted the snake bracelet on her forearm, and vowed, “I will reclaim my birthright. Let the Emperor Games begin.”

Tiger House: The First Chronicle of Jairus Tanner (The Chronicles of Jairus Tanner Book 1) by [Wendy Scott]

My Thoughts:

A well-constructed plot that has more twists and turns than a theme park waterslide. Tiger House serves up plenty of action. Imagery is this novel’s forte. Wendy Scott has a wide and colorful pallet of descriptions that say more than the average photo.

It was easy to connect with the characters emotionally, to cheer on the protagonists and to despise those evil Xjiangsuans.

The conclusion sets the stage for a second book and creates the anticipation of another exciting round of adventure.

The book would have earned a Five Star, but I found the first competition to be unoriginal, and for that it will be designated a Four Star.

I recommend Tiger House for those who enjoy High Fantasy and who look to the skies and wonder, “What If?”

About Wendy:

Wendy Scott

Wendy Scott has a New Zealand Certificate in Science (Chemistry), which allows her to dabble with fuming potions and strange substances, satisfying her inner witch.

Wendy writes fantasy and children’s novels, and short stories.

One of the creeds she lives by is to always – Live a life less ordinary!

Pen Names: Fantasy ~ Wendy Scott, Children’s ~ WJ Scott, (Romance/Paranormal) ~ Wendy Jayne

Connect with Wendy and purchase her works.

Blue Treat Award: RRBC KCT International Literary Book Awards 2017 & 2018.

Twitter:  @WendyJayneScott

Blog

RWISA

Amazon page

You can find Wendy’s books listed under the following categories in the RRBC Catalog:

Children’s Books

Education & Teaching

Paranormal, Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Short Story

Teen & Young Adult

Wendy is a member of Rave Reviews Book Club, check out her Author Page!

 

 

Rafik’s Journey in Silent Heroes. The Hindu Kush Mountains, Written by Patricia Furstenberg.

Today I have the privilege of reposting this blog. It was written by Author Patricia Furstenberg, and she gives us some insight into her new novel, ‘Silent Heroes.’ At the bottom of this post, you will find purchase links and more information about Patricia.

Enjoy!

Rafik, the youngest character from Silent Heroes is forced to leave his home village of Nauzad, alone. Somehow during his trip, no spoilers here, he ends up at Camp Bastion, then is forced to wonder through the Afghan desert and he even takes a drive in the US Marine’s Oshkosh vehicle, a short moment of respiro before his life is endangered again.

We are now approaching the emotional ending of Silent Heroes.

‘Conde immediately took in the mountain sight in front of them, the one shooting towards the sky. There was only one thing higher, the cerulean sky above.’

Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg

journey Hindu Kush mountains

The majestic Hindu Kush Mountains

‘If mountains could, Kent asked himself, would they choose to close their slopes and crush the intruders coming in with wicked thoughts?’

Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg

The Hindu Kush mountains, a natural maze of valleys and peaks blocking all satellite signals are the preferred hiding-spot for the Taliban, their secret lair. Very few locals know how to find their way around.

‘Marcos noticed the zig-zagged pattern of her approach as she followed a barely visible path. For the untrained eye, it looked like nothing, a maze of greenery and rocks. But Marcos saw the trail, wider where the shrubs were missing and the rain had softened the soil, narrower in the rocky passes. In places, it looked like a disturbance in the dirt, like a child had sketched a line with a stick. Nevertheless, it leads upwards, towards the Taliban camp.

As if to mock them, a spring ran on their right side, rushing down the slope, singing and jumping from rock to rock. The steeper the slope, the more cheerful the stream whooshed.’

Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg

fortress-mountain

‘A skinny figure detached itself from the tight group approaching the Marines, his eyes dancing on a dirty face, streaked with dust and blood.

‘You came, you came!’ it chanted then hugged each one of them not minding their weapons poking his ribs. ‘I knew you will come,’ the boy said then turned towards the small crowd in an out-pour of words and gestures.

The bouncy body, the cheerful eyes?’

Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg

Rafik

An Afghan boy about Rafik’s age, eight years.

‘From between the trees, a skinny Afghan boy bounced more than ran down the path and he didn’t stop until he reached the girl. He jumped around her, waving his arms up and down, not sparing any cheer. His cheeks were strung with tears, yet his mouth showed all his teeth in a wide grin.’

Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg

Has Rafik found his people’s peace? Is the young boy finally reunited with his small family – whatever was left from it after the Taliban’s attack on their village?

I wished I could hold his hand, my youngest character, but I could not. Life and war threw insurmountable challenges at him. He was asked to perform missions that put him in life-threatening situations. During his journey he was exposed to an IED field, got lost in the desert and ended in the Hindu Kush Mountains.

But this is war. This is life during wartime. And Rafik made it to the last chapter.

secrets-mountains-Taliban

Will his heartwarming nature and willingness to help be something you will take with you when you close the book? I hope so.

silent-heroes-win

I hope that Rafik’s long journey culminating with the Hindu Kush Mountains spiked your interest. You can BUY Silent Heroes from Amazon UKAmazon USAmazon Australia, Amazon Canada, or Amazon Worldwide: link here to your preferred Amazon website.

ABOUT PAT

Patsmall

Patricia Furstenberg writes with passion about history that blends with fiction, about war heroes, human or canine, and she also pens humorous poetry & haiku about nature and dogs. With a medical degree behind her, Patricia is passionate about mind, brain and education and the psychology behind it. She also loves coffee and she loves to travel.

Her latest book, Silent Heroes: When Love and Values Are Worth Fighting for, is a highly emotional read, action-packed, a vivid story of enormous sacrifice and bravery. Silent Heroes is a narrative about the value of life. Whose are the spoils-of-war? A new look at the War in Afghanistan, at the MWD, Military Working Dogs and the brave Marines fighting it, but also at the Afghans caught in it.

One of her first books, Joyful Trouble, was an Amazon Bestseller in Historical Fiction, Africa.
Her book of poems “As Good As Gold” became a #1 New Release the day it was published.

Patricia’s writing is filled with “creativity and vivid imagery” and she knows how to “capture the reader’s imagination.”
Her words penned in her children’s books “truly make the world a happier and more beautiful place!”

Patricia Furstenberg came to writing though reading, her passion for books being something she inherited from her parents. As a winner of the Write Your Own Christie Competition, the Judges “were impressed by her thorough investigation and admired the strength of her narrative; they were impressed by her style”. The judges thought Patricia’s writing style is “well structured, with a great sense of tension and suspense”, “confident and intriguing”. The Judges were Mathew Prichard, David Brawn from Harper Collins UK and Daniel Mallory from Harper Collins US.

An avid reader, Patricia Furstenberg enjoys historical fiction, especially the Late Middle Ages, and war stories that are a blend of facts, folklore, mystery and include a dog or two. She also loves contemporary fiction, especially mystery and crime, classical poetry and haiku. Some of her favorite authors include, without being limited to, Agatha Christie, Kathy Reichs, Elizabeth Kostova, Dan Brown, Ionel Teodoreanu, Camil Petrescu.

‘I love to explore the human imagination. I am a tourist of history, a permanent guest in the labyrinth of books, a student in the world of art.’

Patricia blogs extensively and has articles & interviews published by Huffington Post UK, Biz Community, Books by Women.

Connect with Patricia

Website

Twitter

Facebook 

Pintrest

Follow Blog on Email

Linked in

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of A Ghost In The Kitchen, Three Ingredients – 2, by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

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aghost2

The Blurb:

A Ghost in the Kitchen, Three Ingredients-2 continues the flapper adventures of Paisley Idelle Peabody, aka Pip. It’s a 1920s “pantser” story and a culinary mystery. This time Pip’s pal Andy (from The Three Things Serial Story) returns. Granny Phanny is there too. She’s still trying to teach Pip to cook. Granny is in a lather because of the supernatural goings-on in her kitchen. There’s also one pos-i-lutely potent poltergeist! New adventures abound as Pip and Andy unravel an old mystery. It’s all spontaneously driven by “ingredients” sent by readers of the blog, Teagan’s Books. Jump into the jalopy and enjoy the ride. There’s no telling where we’ll go, but it will be the cat’s pajamas!

My Thoughts:

I enjoyed this part humorous, part poignant tale of ghostly goings on that began in Granny Phanny’s kitchen, with the introduction of Maestro, the chef poltergeist. Pip and Andy have quite an adventure with all the ghostly characters they meet, and I love the link to food.

If you’re looking for a not-so-scary, but entertaining ghost story, I highly recommend this!

Five stars!

About Teagan:

Teagan

Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene lives in a “high desert” town in the Southwest of the USA.

Teagan had always devoured fantasy novels of every type. Then one day there was no new book readily at hand for reading — so she decided to write one. And she hasn’t stopped writing since.

Her work is colored by her experiences from living in the southern states and the southwest. Teagan most often writes in the fantasy genre, but she also writes cozy mysteries. Whether it’s a 1920s mystery, a steampunk adventure, or urban fantasy, her stories have a strong element of whimsy. There are no extremes in violence, sex, or profanity.

Her blog “Teagan’s Books” contains serial stories written according to “things” from viewers. http://www.teagansbooks.com

Major influences include Agatha Christie, Terry Brooks, David Eddings, Robert Jordan, and Charlaine Harris.

Purchase your copy and connect with Teagan:

Amazon.com

Blog

Pinterest

Facebook

Twitter

YouTube

Linkedin

 

Review of Eventide, (A Hode’s Hill Novel Book 3), by Mae Clair

The Blurb:

The darkness is coming . . .

The old house near Hode’s Hill, Pennsylvania is a place for Madison Hewitt to start over—to put the trauma of her husband’s murder, and her subsequent breakdown, behind her. She isn’t bothered by a burial plot on the property, or the mysterious, sealed cistern in the basement. Not at first. Even the presence of cold spots and strange odors could be fabrications of her still troubled mind. But how to explain her slashed tires, or the ominous messages that grow ever more threatening?

Convinced the answer lies in the past, Madison delves into the history of the home’s original owners, only to discover the origin of a powerful evil. An entity that may be connected to a series of gruesome attacks that have left police baffled. No matter where she turns—past or present—terror lingers just a step away, spurred on by a twisted obsession that can only be satisfied through death…

eventidecover

My Thoughts:

I must confess to not reading the first two books in this series, namely Cusp of Night (Book 1), and End of Day (Book 2). However, my experience with Eventide has left me wanting more!

Mae is a master at creating imagery and the book is peppered with unique descriptive language.

The plot runs in dual timelines that flow together and coincide to unravel the mystery, not only of the old Stewart House, but also the tumultuous personal life of Madison Hewitt.

This is a story for those who enjoy supernatural thrillers, historical fiction, and a hint of romance.

It gets a ‘highly recommended’ Five Stars from me.

About Mae Clair:

 

Maeclair

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Review of Strange Highway, by Beem Weeks

The Blurb:

If you ever find yourself on the Strange Hwy–don’t turn around. Don’t panic. Just. Keep. Going. You never know what you’ll find.

You’ll see magic at the fingertips of an autistic young man,

  • A teen girl’s afternoon, lifetime of loss.
  • A winged man, an angel? Demon–?
  • Mother’s recognition, peace to daughter.
  • Danny’s death, stifled secrets.
  • Black man’s music, guitar transforms boy.
  • Dead brother, open confession.
  • First love, supernatural?–family becomes whole!

You can exit the Strange Hwy  and come back any time you want.

See, now you know the way in, don’t be a stranger.

My thoughts:

I won this wonderful collection of short stories some time ago, but only recently had the time to crack it open.

Strange Hwy is comprised of nineteen stories that range from the supernatural, to the earthly. Some ended in tragedy, while others made me smile, happy for the outcome.

There were copious servings of poignancy, situations that seemed all too real, but that’s a sign of great writing. One in particular, had me scratching my head as to what really happened to a young girl.

Each tale is unique and there’s no distinguishable pattern that I could detect, for me, that’s a good thing.

I’d highly recommend taking a journey down this highway.

Five Stars for Strange Hwy!

About Beem:

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